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SoundPEATS Air3 Deluxe Earbuds review: Big sound for a small price

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Neuralink Shows Sake the Monkey Typing With Its Brain Chip

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Neuralink, Elon Musk’s start-up that hopes to get our brains to connect directly to computers, demonstrated on Wednesday how a monkey named Sake could type using just its mind to create a virtual keyboard Taxes.

The monkey didn’t know how to spell, but he could follow the keys, which Neuralink lit up yellow on the screen. An N1 chip embedded in the monkey’s skull registered brain activity to control how the monkey moved a cursor across the screen.

It’s a step beyond the mind pong game Neuralink showed off in 2021, but so far it’s still just listening for neural activity. After all, the company also wants to send signals to the brain. This will enable the first two medical use cases: helping the blind see and helping the paraplegic walk.

“We’re confident that someone who has no other interface to the outside world would be able to better control their phone than someone who has working hands,” Musk said Neuralink’s “Show and Tell” event. “Sake, the monkey only moves the cursor with its mind.”


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Elon Musk releases Monkey Typing’s latest Neuralink demo


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Musk has some credibility when it comes to disruptive technology, with his electric vehicle company Tesla fundamentally changing cars and his SpaceX outfit transforming access to space with reusable rockets. But his reputation as a tech genius has taken a hit with that Chaos on Twitter after his $44 billion acquisition. So does Musk’s Boring Company, which aims to innovate car transportation with tunnels has not yet kept its promises.

Neuralink doesn’t look any easier than social networks. Connecting computer hardware to our own wetware presents enormous technical, regulatory and ethical challenges.

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Get a Magic Keyboard and Magic Mouse for your Mac and save $39

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ICA Miami and other museums continue to collect and display NFTs even as the market sinks, arguing digital art has a long history and valuations are unimportant (Farah Nayeri/New York Times)

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Farah Nayeri / New York Times:

The ICA Miami and other museums continue to collect and display NFTs even as the market falls, arguing that digital art has a long history and reviews are unimportant– ICA Miami owns some, and MFA Boston and others are selling them to reach new audiences “in a world where Instagram and Siri are rampant.”

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