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How to add tags to Notes and Reminders entries for smarter organization

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Indian Government Sued Over VPN Logging Orders

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A hosting company has sued the Indian government, challenging newly implemented orders Targeting virtual private networks. As first reported by Enttrackr’s Aroon Deep On Wednesday, Pune-based company SnTHostings argued in its petition to the Delhi High Court that the new government guidelines undermine the fundamental operation of VPNs by requiring companies to track and store user data.

Continue reading: India orders VPN companies to collect and hand over user data

Although VPN services for India’s users are still operated remotely, SnTHosting’s lawyers pointed to the withdrawal of VPN servers in the country by major providers such as ExpressVPN, NordVPN and Surfshark. The firm said the order by India’s Computer Emergency Response Team, known as CERT-in, not only belies the whole point of VPNs, but also defies precedents protecting online privacy and violates the country’s constitutionally protected business rights.

“VPN services anonymize outbound traffic by encrypting online activity. This ensures that financial data such as bank account, credit card (and) debit card details are not accessible to third parties, thus promoting cybersecurity,” the company’s lawyers said in the 33-sided suit.

Continue reading: Casual vs. Critical: If your VPN is a matter of life or death, here’s how to choose one

Other VPN companies have continued to remove servers within Indian borders in response to the CERT-in policy, including providers PureVPN and ProtonVPN. The latter has offered a surveillance countermeasure called Indian Smart Routing, which gives the user an Indian IP address from servers physically located in Singapore.

SnTHosting’s lawsuit is scheduled to begin on December 9th.

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Google is sending Stadia to its infamous graveyard of canceled services

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what just happened From the start, there were fears that Stadia would end up in Google’s notorious graveyard of terminated services. Those fears have now come true, but the death of Stadia is far from the end of cloud gaming as competing services continue to expand.

Google has announced It will shut down Stadia permanently on January 18, 2023. The company has already shut down all Stadia-related transactions in its store, and it is prepare full refunds on most Stadia purchases.

Anyone who purchased Stadia hardware like the controller or a Stadia Chromecast bundle through the Google Store should be eligible for a refund by January 18th. Unfortunately, those who bought Stadia products through retail stores like Best Buy are out of luck.

The company will also refund Stadia games and in-game transactions, but not Stadia Pro subscriptions. Current Pro subscribers can continue to use premium features for free until the date of shutdown.

Stadia was launched in 2019 to play high-end games over the cloud without spending hundreds of dollars on a gaming console or powerful PC. The service included a free tier, a subscription with a selection of games, and a library of titles that could be purchased outside of the subscription.

Unfortunately, Stadia struggled to find a large enough audience interested in its games and not preferring to run them locally on console or PC. Google shut down Stadia’s first-party game studio in February 2021.

A year later the company panned Stadia plans to offer backend cloud services to companies like Peloton, Capcom, and Bungie while maintaining its customer-centric streaming service. Google will continue to use Stadia’s underlying technology for this purpose after next January, and will also use it to support YouTube, Google Play and augmented reality technology.

It wasn’t until the end of July that Google denied reports that Stadia has shut down, but it seems like a lot can change in just two months.

Meanwhile, other cloud gaming services like Nvidia’s GeForce Now and Microsoft’s Xbox Cloud Gaming are showing no signs of slowing down. Earlier this year, both services offered a workaround for playing Fortnite on iOS after Apple banned the title from its App Store. GeForce Now and Xbox Cloud are also coming for devices like Samsung TVs and Logitech’s forthcoming G Cloud handheld.

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SoundPEATS Air3 Deluxe Earbuds review: Big sound for a small price

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