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Border Patrol Union: ‘Failing’ Biden Policies, Hardships Result In 17 Suicides In ’22

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(The middle square)

Chris Cabrera, vice president of the National Border Patrol Council, testified before Congress about the hardships border patrol officers are going through.

Last year was particularly tough, he said, when 17 agents committed suicide.

“To put that in perspective,” he said, of the roughly 35,000-strong New York City Police Force force, they lost 4 to suicide.

“We see a lot of things out there that the average person doesn’t see. What hits people hardest is what happens to the children,” he said, referring to human trafficking and the repatriation of unaccompanied young children.

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“It’s a difficult job,” he said. “It’s getting increasingly difficult because we’re not being able to do the jobs we were trained to do. The Border Patrol is the only union in union history that actually demands more jobs.”

“Let’s work. Let’s do our job,” he pleaded.

Cabrera testifies Wednesday before the US House Homeland Security Committee at a border security field hearing in Pharr, Texas, on behalf of 16,000 border security officers representing the NBPC.

“Morale has dropped significantly,” he said. “Our agents are frustrated that we’re babysitting,” he said, referring to the job of admitting and releasing illegal aliens into the United States rather than deporting them, securing the border and thwarting cartel activities — jobs they were trained to do .

“About 30-40% of our agents actually go into the field on any given day,” he said, but then they’re called back to fill out paperwork or transport people to drop-off locations. “The really bad guys, the smugglers, who harm people, who bring jobs into this country, or human trafficking, escape and that affects the agents’ desire to do their jobs,” he said.

Related: Limit: 205,000 arrests, Gotaways in February as Gotaways increase in the west

In fiscal year 2022, border patrol agents detained an unprecedented 2.2 million illegal foreign nationals, he said, about five times the number in the Trump administration’s last year “and a clear sign of how this administration’s border policies are failing.” he said.

About half of those arrested last year have been expelled under Title 42, which expires in May, he said. The majority who were not deported were released to the United States. Agents also reported “well over 1.2 million confirmed” escape attempts in the last two years, by those who are intentionally trying to evade arrest by law enforcement.

“They just escaped because we didn’t have enough agents to apprehend them,” he said. “To put this in perspective, we are currently in the Rio Grande Valley with a population of 1.3 million people. We illegally marched almost the entire population of this area into this country because we didn’t have the manpower to stop them. If that doesn’t define a problem, then I don’t know what it is.”

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To solve the “border chaos,” two solutions could be implemented immediately: stop capture and release and hire more border guards.

Cabrera said he had made these suggestions before, including when he testified before the Senate Homeland Security Committee in 2015. He told senators at the time, and again on Wednesday, “As long as we continue to release illegal immigrants into this country, they will keep coming.” As simple as that.”

He also said ending the policy is the law and the Biden administration is violating it. “Ending catch and release,” he said, “is the law. Section 235(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act requires Homeland Security to apprehend all illegally entered migrants.”

Related: Border Chief: The majority illegally invading the Tucson sector are single military-age males

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The law allows officials “to fire individuals on a case-by-case basis for urgent humanitarian Centre County Reports or significant public benefit,” he said, but that’s “not what the Biden administration has done for the past two years.”

He also said it is Congress’s responsibility to ensure Border Patrol agents can fulfill their mission to secure the border and that he must prioritize agent retention and recruitment.

“The Border Patrol roster is currently about 19,300 agents,” he said, pointing to Joe Modlin, Tucson’s sector chief Transcript told the House Oversight Committee last month that at least 22,000 agents would be needed to deal with the current crisis.

“Increasing the net workforce by 2,700 agents,” he said, “may sound simple,” but it “will require a tremendous effort.” Border Patrol has “a problem” because its current turnover rate is 6.9% — 72% higher than the Office of Field Operations — and is “expected to increase to over 9% by 2028.”

The main Centre County Report Border Patrol can’t recruit and retain agents is because it doesn’t have pay parity with other federal law enforcement agencies, he said. If the Border Patrol “continues to bleed personnel, there’s no way we’re going to secure the border,” he warned.

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Syndicated with permission from The middle square.

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The FBI Is Investigating A Death Threat Against Alvin Bragg From Florida

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The NYPD and FBI are investigating a white power letter sent to Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg threatening him with death.

NBC News reported:

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The FBI and NYPD are investigating a letter containing a death threat and white powder that was sent to Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg, whose office is investigating former President Donald Trump, law enforcement officials told NBC News.

The letter was addressed to Bragg and read, “ALVIN: I WILL KILL YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!” the sources said. It contained a small amount of white powder.

The white powder was harmless and no one was injured. The letter was sent from Orlando, Florida. It was dated Tuesday, the same day Donald Trump falsely claimed he would be arrested.

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Death threats against Bragg from Trump supporters come as no surprise because the former President spent days attacking the Manhattan District Attorney, who seems poised to indict him as early as next week.

The mass protests Trump has called for have not materialized, but that doesn’t mean his less stable supporters will just sit on the couch and watch Fox News while their hero may face prosecution.

Threats against Alvin Bragg are only likely to increase in the coming days. Trump incites his most extreme supporters, but none of this will save him from being held accountable for possible crimes.

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Brazilian Prosecutors Accept Deal with George Santos

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“Prosecutors in Brazil have settled with Rep. George Santos in a case alleging he defrauded a Rio de Janeiro-area employee out of $1,300 over clothes and shoes in 2008.” CNN reports.

“A petition by Santos’ attorney demanding a settlement says that Santos would agree to officially confess to the crime and pay damages to the victim, an employee from the Rio de Janeiro region, as required by Brazilian law .”

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Trump Wanted To Undermine Defamation Laws. DeSantis is Taking Action.

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Standing in front of a large American flag an event Promotes civic education “on subjects such as the rights and duties of citizens … and also in understanding the philosophical underpinnings of the American republic,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) made a case for abolishing freedom of the press.

He supports Florida House Bill 991DeSantis explained in his plan to facilitate Maybe sue journalists for defamation most controversial by changing the legal status of anonymous procurement. “If someone is being defamed… if [the journalist is] Using anonymous sources, this may be a guess that this was done with malice,” DeSantis said Thursday. “I think what happened is that corporate media in particular relied on anonymous sources to frame people.”

But don’t worry, discouraging HB 991 from sourcing anonymously “won’t make much of a difference in terms of freedom of expression,” DeSantis added. It will merely “make some people not put out things that are wrong, that tarnish someone’s reputation”.

Of course it will also cause Some people don’t want to post things that are true but unflattering to — or implying — public figures like DeSantis the obvious case that anonymous sourcing proves correct, President Richard Nixon.

This bill isn’t all bad, and there’s fair criticism of the over-reliance on anonymous sources when it comes to trivial matters. But all in all, this bill is an assault on press freedom, and his endorsement by DeSantis suggests there isn’t much daylight between him and his alleged chief rival, former President Donald Trump, on a key constitutional matter.

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HB 991 is appropriate in a way. For example, it offers that You don’t become a public figure by giving an interview to the press; to “defend publicly against allegations”; be the subject of a viral video or photo; or holding “public employment other than elected office or appointment by an elected official.”

In other words, being a teacher or a DMV employee does not make you a public figure. Let’s not say that “Central Park Karen” or the “nobody has time for that“Woman. In a libel lawsuit, HB 991 says that without any other kind of fame — any willful entry into public life, such as cultivation of fame or running for office — these people should be treated as private individuals who enjoy a stronger standard of reputation protection.

I’m not sure if this distinction is correct Exactly as written. Protecting people who give a man-in-the-street interview or involuntarily become viral memes makes sense, but police officers strike me as public servants who, because of their unique role, which includes proprietary application heard of violence as public figures should be treated. some critics also argued HB 991’s demarcation could violate Supreme Court precedent. Still, the underlying idea – to specify what it means to be a public figure in a digital age where sudden, unwanted notoriety is possible in ways that have not been the case in the recent past – seems fair .

It’s also fair to say that the media sometimes goes overboard with anonymous sourcing. I thought so myself, particularly during the Trump administration, when comments from unnamed “people close to the President” were regularly the basis for high-profile but objectively low-brow reporting of White House personal drama, mostly telling us, knew what we said before: that Trump was petty, sneaky and ill-equipped for office. A story doesn’t have to reach Watergate’s prominence to justify reliance on sources who don’t consent to being credited, but that hardly means every snippet of anonymous gossip deserves publication.

And yet, as always when fundamental individual rights are at stake, there is – or should be – a yawning gap between them this is a foolish or careless or risky way of exercising this right And we should make this functionally illegalwhich HB 991 almost does with anonymous sourcing.

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That’s not the only problem with the bill either. Its determination is a “claim that the Complainant discriminated against another person or group because of their race, sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity.” automatically enough for a libel lawsuit is similarly troubling because of its likely impact on freedom of expression.

Likewise, the mention of “any presentation before an audience” or “statement on the Internet” as a basis for cases of defamation. As a New York Times editorial notes, which could respectively mean “testimony at school board hearings and other public gatherings” or “a tweet or Facebook post written by anyone.” It’s not as bad as in the UK charge of “grossly offensive” tweets, but it’s a step in that direction of public speaking.

It’s also a step in the direction Trump wants to go. “One of the things I will do if I win,” he said said in 2016“I’m going to open up our defamation laws so we can sue them and win big bucks if they intentionally write negative and horrible and false articles.”

The was always a pipe dream, since the relevant laws, such as HB 991 itself, are largely determined at the state level and therefore do not fall within the purview of the President. But the animosity that underpins the threat and Trump’s ability to do so as president restrict freedom of the press with tools that are also used below the Obama And Biden administrationsis pretty real.

That animosity is apparently something DeSantis shares. If elected president, he may resort to the same anti-press tools of surveillance and suppression of dissent. And in the meantime, as governor, he could “open” Florida’s libel laws and do in real life what Trump only imagined.

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